Health News

This Vitamin May Save Older Women from Falls
Could a single vitamin help keep postmenopausal women on their feet?
Atrial Fibrillation: What Women Need to Know
Heart rhythm disorders affect more than 2 million Americans. The most common of these disorders is atrial fibrillation (AFib) — and it may affect women differently than men.
The More Exercise, The Better For Older Women
For most people, slimming down can lower the risk for many conditions. But, for postmenopausal women, maintaining a healthy weight may be especially important.
For Older Women, Healthy Habits Pay Off
For older adults, maintaining a healthy diet and exercise routine can be important. For muscle mass loss, it may be crucial.
Exercise: It May Not Stop Falls, but It Could Still Help
When it comes to falls and fractures, an ounce of prevention really is worth a pound of cure. While supplements may improve older people's health, exercise remains the best way to boost strength and mobility and help prevent serious falls.
Slimming Down Your Cancer Risk
Having a healthy weight is a well-known way to help maintain good heart health, but new evidence suggests that, in women, staying slim could cut cancer risk.
Ovarian Problem May Have Other Health Effects
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and infertility have been well-known dance partners for many years. Now new evidence suggests that PCOS is also dancing with a lot of other chronic health issues.
Fracture Was Hard to Predict in Some Postmenopausal Women
Screening tools can help doctors predict which postmenopausal women may have a broken bone due to osteoporosis in the next few years. But those tools may not accurately predict fracture risk in younger postmenopausal women.
Healthy Habits May Be Strike Against Stroke
Every year, more women than men have strokes, according to the National Stroke Association. Healthy lifestyle choices like eating right and exercise, however, may keep stroke at bay.
Mother’s Iron Level Tied to Child’s Autism Risk
Iron deficiency has been associated with autism in past studies, such as one published in Pediatrics in 2012. And children of mothers who have too little iron during pregnancy may also have a higher risk of getting this condition.