Health News

Walking Your Way Back to Brain Health
Relearning how to walk after a stroke or brain injury can be a difficult task. An innovative method for alternating walking patterns may aid patients in regaining their usual walking ability.
Restless Legs Connected With Hypertension
For middle-aged women with restless legs syndrome, it's not just itching and an irresistible urge to move the legs. It also may be a risk factor for high blood pressure.
Where You Live Impacts Your Heart
There has been a steady decline in the number of Americans with coronary heart disease in recent years, yet rates vary by race and ethnicity, and residents of some states have a risk that is more than double other geographic regions.
Do Smoking Women Weaken Hearts?
Smoking doesn't discriminate -- leading to health risks for anyone who picks up the habit. For women, that risk may be exaggerated after a heart attack.
Statins May Aid Brain Injury Patients
Medication to lower cholesterol may have some unexpected benefits. In older patients, statins to lower cholesterol significantly improve survival rates after a traumatic brain injury.
Smoking Prompts Earlier Strokes
Smokers aren't just at an added risk for strokes. They're at risk at risk for having them up to a decade earlier than those who don't smoke.
Small Silent Strokes Increase Risks
Small undetected strokes are not uncommon in older patients. These incidences may be contributing to an increased risk of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in such patients.
Kids Need to Seize the Day
Kids shouldn’t have to worry about pre-diabetes or an increased risk for heart disease. They should be focused on enjoying life. But obesity is serious and affecting many children.
U.S. Plan Announced to Cut Heart Attacks
Working vigorously to reduce cardiovascular deaths, U.S. health officials have announced a national program that partners with private insurance companies to prevent one million heart attacks and strokes over five years.
America is Up In Smokes
Tobacco use is the most preventable cause of death in the United States, yet so many Americans choose to continue day after day. The rates are slowly declining, but by how much?