Health News

Beer: The Health Benefits and Consequences
Many Americans enjoy their alcohol, spending close to $99 billion every year on beer alone. Here’s a list of potential health benefits and consequences of beer consumption.
Hormone Therapy After Menopause Upped Pancreatitis Risk
Many women use hormone replacement therapy to help with menopause symptoms. But the treatment does carry some increased risks for developing other medical conditions.
Surprising Side Effects of OTC Meds
If you are using over-the-counter medications, stay aware of these fifteen common side effects.
Pregnant with Bowel Trouble, But It's Ok
Women who plan on becoming pregnant can also plan for bodily changes in other areas, including bowel movements, or lack there of. Could these changes impact a pregnant woman's quality of life?
FDA Approves Diclegis
The US Food and Drug Administration today approved Diclegis (doxylamine succinate and pyridoxine hydrochloride) to treat pregnant women experiencing nausea and vomiting.
Sex Hormones Not to Blame for Heartburn
Elevated sex hormone levels in pregnant women or in those who take hormone replacement therapy (HRT) were often believed to be the culprit behind prevalent heartburn in women. But that may not be the case.
Hormone Therapy Patients Have More Surgeries
To ensure hormone levels stay balanced and regulate the body, women who hit menopause may start hormone therapy. But menopause hormone therapies are not without risk.
Strong Acne Meds Okay for Gastro Tract
When birth control pills can't clear up acne in women, a stronger medicine is the next step. But doctors and patients have been concerned about a few of these medicines and their possible links to inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD).
The Gapped Smile from Heavy Smoking
One consequence to smoking cigarettes is losing teeth. Women who are past menopause aren't free from that consequence: the heavier the smoker, the more likely they may be to lose their pearly whites.
Nausea Medicine Okay for Expecting Moms
Some women take medication for severe morning sickness. But it is sometimes difficult to gather enough information to know if medicines are always safe enough for unborn babies.