Health News

No Change in Change-of-Life Hormone Warnings
A decade ago, when a woman reached menopause, she likely reached for hormone replacement therapy to calm the symptoms associated with the change in life. Then a large study called the Women's Health Initiative challenged that treatment.
Women with Arrhythmia at Greater Stroke Risk
Women with a common abnormal heartbeat condition called atrial fibrillation are at a greater risk of stroke even if they take anticoagulants to lower their risk. This was especially true for women over the age of 75.
Moderate Drinking Drops Stroke Risk in Women
Women have another reason to raise their glasses. Moderate alcohol consumption appears to lessen the risk of stroke among women.
After Menopause Trans Fat Intake Ups Risk
High consumption of trans fats such as fried or processed foods may catch up with women later in life. Postmenopausal women who indulge in higher amounts of trans fats appear to be at an increased risk of stroke.
Citrus Fruits Lower Stroke Risk for Women
Citrus fruits such as oranges and grapefruits do more than function as a tasty snack. In women, a compound found in citrus fruits also appears to lower the risk of stroke.
Fight Menopause With a Strong Heart
Menopause, which is the end of menstruation and fertility, causes many changes in a women’s health. A new study shows that a hormone may help fight age-related arterial stiffness, a condition that’s associated with menopause.
Women With PAD Undertreated But Higher Risk
Peripheral artery disease (PAD) affects men and women nearly equally. Yet women are still more likely to go undiagnosed, even though the serious circulatory disease can nearly triple their risk of stroke and heart attack.
Stroke Risk Prediction for Women
Certain factors have been traditionally used for predicting the risk for stroke, such as high cholesterol. But these factors may not be very accurate in predicting stroke risk for postmenopausal women.
Eating Away at Stroke Risk
Women may be able to lower their risk of stroke just by changing what they eat -- even if they have a history of heart disease. Fruits, vegetables and whole grains, which are high in antioxidants, appear to offer positive heart benefits.
Abuse Increases Heart Disease Risk in Women
Physical or sexual abuse can leave lingering emotional scars on young girls. Such abuse also may affect them physically -- increasing their risk for heart disease, including heart attacks and strokes, once they become adults.