Health News

Lifestyle Linked to RA
While the exact cause of rheumatoid arthritis remains unknown, scientists are getting a better idea of what puts people at risk for this painful disease. It seems lifestyle may have a lot to do with that risk.
Breathing Heavy
Overweight or obese people undergoing a lung transplant may have increased risk for complications. Lung donors that smoked can hurt the odds too, but don’t refuse their lungs so quickly.
Weight Gain Vs. Continued Smoking
Among smokers, a common reason to not quit is the fear of gaining weight. While weight gain is a serious concern, continuing to smoke is a greater concern.
Have A Drink, Not Four
Crossing the line between one or two drinks to three or four isn’t difficult, but it may not be healthy. Researchers have found that many people have been drinking too much.
Is Drinking Related to Cancer?
Studies in the past have shown links between heavy drinking and cancer. Previous research has found drinking red wine fights cancer. But what about just drinking in general?
Making New Year’s Resolutions Stick
Every year people make New Year’s resolutions, and every year it’s a battle to stick with them. Plan ahead, set up a support network and use good coping tactics to stay the course.
Overindulgence vs. Healthy Habits
Veggies are good for the body. Smoking is bad. Most people have these facts down by now, but do they know how good and how bad? A math professor has simplified a way to look at how habits add or take away years of life.
Keeping a Cork in it During the Holidays
Holidays are rife with temptations, especially in the form of alcohol. It can be tempting for alcoholics to break a sobriety streak when everyone else is celebrating.
Whiskey & Diet Coke; No Make That Soda Water
Diet soda can help cut the calories in cocktails, but can also put a person over the legal alcohol limit without them ever knowing it. Yes, regular and diet soda do affect the body differently.
Loss of Control: Food, Drugs & Depression
Binge eating may be a predictor of marijuana and other drug use and depression. The good news is binge eating can be successfully treated.