Coagulation Factor X (Human)

Coagulation Factor X (Human) helps stop or prevent bleeding in those with hereditary Factor X deficiency. It offers a new treatment option for those with this rare bleeding disorder.

Coagulation Factor X (Human) Overview

Reviewed: October 26, 2015
Updated: 

Coagulation Factor X (Human) is a prescription medication used to help stop or prevent bleeding in those with hereditary Factor X deficiency, a rare, inherited bleeding disorder. 

It belongs to a group of drugs called blood coagulation factors. These work to activate substances in your blood to form clots and decrease bleeding episodes.

This medication is available as a powder for solution to be injected directly into the vein (IV) by a healthcare professional.

Common side effects of coagulation Factor X (human) include pain and redness at the injection site and fatigue.

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Coagulation Factor X (Human) Cautionary Labels

precautionsprecautions

Uses of Coagulation Factor X (Human)

Coagulation Factor X is a prescription medication used to help stop or prevent bleeding in adults and children (aged 12 years and above) with hereditary Factor X deficiency, a rare, inherited bleeding disorder. 

Coagulation Factor X can be used to control bleeding episodes. It can also be used to manage bleeding after surgery in patients with mild hereditary Factor X deficiency.

This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Coagulation Factor X (Human) Brand Names

Coagulation Factor X (Human) may be found in some form under the following brand names:

Coagulation Factor X (Human) Drug Class

Coagulation Factor X (Human) is part of the drug class:

Side Effects of Coagulation Factor X (Human)

Serious side effects have been reported with coagulation Factor X. See the “Coagulation Factor X Precautions” section.

Common side effects of coagulation Factor X include the following:

  • redness and pain at the injection site
  • fatigue
  • back pain

This is not a complete list of coagulation Factor X side effects. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Tell your doctor if you have any side effect that bothers you or that does not go away.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to the FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Coagulation Factor X (Human) Interactions

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements. Especially tell your doctor if you take:

  • anticoagulant (blood thinner) medications that are Factor Xa inhibitors, such as fondaparinux (Arixtra), apixaban (Eliquis), edoxaban (Savaysa), or rivaroxaban (Xarelto)

This is not a complete list of coagulation Factor X drug interactions. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information.

Coagulation Factor X (Human) Precautions

Serious side effects have been reported with this medication including the following:

Allergic reactions. You can have an allergic reaction to coagulation Factor X. Stop treatment and call your healthcare provider right away if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • difficulty breathing
  • chest tightness
  • swelling of the face, lips, arms, or legs
  • rash or hives

Antibody formation. Your body can also make antibodies, called “inhibitors,” against coagulation Factor X, which may stop this medication from working properly. Your healthcare provider may give you blood tests to check for inhibitors.

Infections that may be transmitted from this medication. Coagulation Factor X is made from human blood and may contain infectious agents, such as viruses, that can be transmitted while using this medication and cause diseases. Report any symptom that concerns you to your healthcare provider.

You should not receive this medication if you are allergic (hypersensitive) to any of the ingredients in coagulation Factor X.

Coagulation Factor X (Human) Food Interactions

Medications can interact with certain foods. In some cases, this may be harmful and your doctor may advise you to avoid certain foods. In the case of coagulation Factor X, there are no specific foods that you must exclude from your diet when receiving this medication.

Inform MD

Before receiving coagulation Factor X, tell your doctor about all of your medical conditions. Especially tell your doctor if you:

  • are allergic to coagulation Factor X or to any of its ingredients
  • are taking anticoagulant medications such as apixaban (Eliquis), edoxaban (Savaysa), fondaparinux (Arixtra), or rivaroxaban (Xarelto)
  • are pregnant or plan to become pregnant
  • are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed
  • have or have had any medical problems
  • have any allergies
  • have been told you have inhibitors to Factor X

Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take including prescription and non-prescription medicines, vitamins, and herbal supplements.

Coagulation Factor X (Human) and Pregnancy

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant.

No studies have been done in animals, and no well-controlled studies have been done in pregnant women. Coagulation Factor X should be given to a pregnant woman only if clearly needed.

Coagulation Factor X (Human) and Lactation

Tell your doctor if you are breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed.

It is not known if this medication crosses into human milk. Because many medications can cross into human milk and because of the possibility for serious adverse reactions in nursing infants with use of this medication, a choice should be made whether to stop nursing or stop the use of this medication. Your doctor and you will decide if the benefits outweigh the risk of using coagulation Factor X.

Coagulation Factor X (Human) Usage

This medication is available as a powder for solution to be injected directly into the vein (IV) by a healthcare professional. 

You may receive this medication at a hemophilia treatment center, at your healthcare provider’s office or in your home. You should be trained on how to do infusions by your healthcare provider or hemophilia treatment center.

Many people with coagulation factor deficiencies learn to infuse their treatment by themselves or with the help of a family member.

  • Inject coagulation Factor X when the first sign of bleeding occurs, before surgery as a precaution, and before the onset of menstrual bleeding, if appropriate and advised by your healthcare provider.
  • Repeat the injection at intervals of 24 hours to stop the bleeding. Each individual bleed should be judged on its own severity.

Your healthcare provider will tell you how much coagulation Factor X to use based on your weight, the severity of your Factor X deficiency, and where you are bleeding. You may need blood tests done after using coagulation Factor X to be sure that your blood level of Factor X is high enough to clot your blood.

Call your healthcare provider right away if your bleeding does not stop after using this medication.

You must carefully follow your healthcare provider's instructions regarding the dosing and administration for infusing this medication so that your treatment will work best for you.

Coagulation Factor X (Human) Dosage

The dosage and duration of treatment depend on the severity of the Factor X deficiency, on the location and extent of the bleeding and on the patient’s clinical condition.

Coagulation Factor X (Human) Overdose

If you administer too much coagulation Factor X, call your healthcare provider or local Poison Control Center, or seek emergency medical attention right away.

If this medication is administered by a healthcare provider in a medical setting, it is unlikely that an overdose will occur. However, if overdose is suspected, seek emergency medical attention.

Other Requirements

  • Keep coagulation Factor X in its original package to protect it from light.
  • Store coagulation Factor X refrigerated [not below 2°C (36°F)] or at room temperature [not to exceed 30°C (86°F)]. Do not freeze.
  • Do not use after the expiration date printed on the box. The expiration date refers to the last day of that month.
  • Do not use the sterile water if any small bits can be seen in it.
  • After reconstitution (mixing with the sterile water), coagulation Factor X must be used within one hour. Discard any medication left in the vial at the end of your infusion.