Health News

This Mama's Smokin'
Maternal cigarette smoking in the first trimester was associated with a 20 to 70 percent greater likelihood that a baby would be born with certain types of congenital heart defects, according to a study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
You're Still Drunk, Dummy
As the FDA and state governments are cracking down on the sale of caffeinated alcoholic beverages, a recent article outlines the extent of the public health problem posed by such beverages.
Drinking Early Leads to Drinking Later
The Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index (RAPI) is used to evaluate adolescent drinking related problems. A new study shows that RAPI is not only an effective screening method but also a predictor of alcoholism.
This is Your Brain on Drugs
People with addictions to stimulants tend to choose instant gratification or a smaller but sooner reward over a future benefit, even if the future reward is greater.
End Addiction with a Vaccine?
Researchers have produced a lasting anti-cocaine immunity in mice by giving them a safe vaccine that combines bits of the common cold virus with a particle that mimics cocaine.
Second-Hand Smoke Does It Again
Past studies have shown that women smokers have a higher risk of cervical cancer. Now, new research shows that second-hand smoke may damage cells in a woman's cervix, increasing her risk of cervical cancer.
Don't Miss a Beat
A meta-analysis of 14 studies has led researchers to believe that even moderate alcohol consumption can contribute to atrial fibrillation, or irregular heart beat.
Pass Out Hard, Sleep Lightly
For decades, researchers have known that alcohol can affect your quality of sleep. Now, a new study shows that the alcohol disrupts the quality of sleep in healthy women more than in healthy men.
Risk Assessments
Children of alcoholics face a steep uphill battle -- against their at-home environment, their families, even their genetics. Fortunately there is more awareness and research devoted to alcoholism's effects on children than ever before.
This Word Isn't on the Street
The number of stroke patients with a history of street drug use has risen more than nine fold in the past 13 years, according to a new study from the University of Cincinnati.