Health News

Antivirals May Help Those With Diabetes and Hepatitis
Patients with the hepatitis C virus (HCV), which primarily affects the liver, face a higher chance of getting diabetes. Antiviral HCV medication, however, may improve diabetes outcomes.
Key Groups Not Knowledgeable About HPV Vaccine
If there was a vaccine that could possibly prevent cancer, everyone would get it — right? The answer is more complicated than that, as a new study focusing on HPV vaccination showed.
FDA Approves Sovaldi for Chronic Hepatitis C
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Sovaldi (sofosbuvir) to treat chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection.
How Vaccines Have Changed Disease Rates
Sometimes it's easy to forget how common many diseases were before vaccines for them were introduced. When the disease is not around, people may not notice as much.
New HIV Guidelines Encourage Regular Health Check-Ups
New advancements in HIV treatment have allowed many people to live with a very small amount of the virus in their bodies. But what are the pros and cons?
FDA Approves New Treatment for Hepatitis C Virus
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Olysio (simeprevir), a new therapy to treat chronic hepatitis C virus infection.
Global Trends in Oral Cancers
It used to be that smoking and drinking alcohol were the biggest risk factors for cancers that develop in the mouth and throat. Those trends may be changing, according to a new study.
Some Hep C Patients Going Untreated
Many assume that once patients are diagnosed with a disease, they automatically begin receiving treatment for that condition — but researchers behind a new study warning that this may not be the case for many patients with hepatitis C.
New Treatment for Hepatitis C Patients
Some people with hepatitis C experience serious side effects from or do not respond to interferons, the typical treatment for the disease. Fortunately, new research has shown promising results for a different type of treatment.
HIV Boosted Bone Fracture Risk
HIV/AIDS treatment has helped lengthen patients' lives. But as they live longer, people with HIV may have to be especially watchful for health problems related to age, including the possibility of weaker bones.