Infectious DiseaseInfo Center

More than an Athlete's Foot
Close contact is common among athletes who participate in team sports. This closeness can lead to the spread of various skin infections, dermatologists warn.
HIV Awareness: Low Income, High Risk
With more than 450,000 African-Americans estimated to have been diagnosed with AIDS since the disease became recognized in the early 1980s, HIV has impacted the black community more than any other race.
Saved by Salmonella?
Using one bug to combat another, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, are hard at work on experiments that may one day lead to anti-viral treatments using something that most people try to kill; Salmonella bacteria.
Something Like a Cold Leads to Diabetes
Although the causes of type 1 diabetes remain largely unknown, Australian researchers have added support to the evidence showing that cold-like viruses may be responsible for the disease.
Safety in Numbers
A review by scientists found that of the near 90 million doses of H1N1 flu vaccine administered in 2009-2010 in China, no pattern of serious side effects has emerged.
Closing Schools for the Flu
When there is an outbreak of flu or other epidemics, selective school closures are considered one way to reduce the number of cases. However, new research shows that this limited tactic may be ineffective.
Fatter People, Longer Stays
Obesity contributes to many health complications. However, a new study by Spanish researchers suggests that obesity may not increase the risk of death among people with swine flu.
Waitlisted
Liver cancer patients who are HIV-positive and waiting for a liver transplant are less likely to receive the surgery, according to new research from France.
When Hepatitis A Turns Fatal
A study from South Korea has found a link between the Hepatitis A virus and patients with pre-existing chronic liver disease and identified the age group most at risk.
Unprotected Old Folks
During both the 2009 H1N1 flu epidemic and the whooping cough outbreak in California, elderly Hispanics had high rates of infection. New research suggests this might be due to low vaccination rates and language.