Rheumatoid ArthritisInfo Center

Obesity May Increase Risk of Arthritis in Women
Being obese or overweight can increase the risk of a host of health problems — diabetes, heart disease and stroke, for instance. Packing too many pounds may also raise the risk of rheumatoid arthritis.
Falls More Common in Arthritis Patients
Falls are a big concern for many older adults, but should falling be something that middle-aged adults with arthritis consider, too? A new study suggests so.
A Bit of Beer May Lower RA Risk
Yes we know that drinking too much alcohol can be dangerous. But drinking smaller amounts of beer may have some health benefits for women concerned with RA.
Treating Two Knees with One Surgery
Patients with arthritis in both knees sometimes choose to undergo a double replacement surgery on the same day. A recent study looked at whether this operation is safe for rheumatoid arthritis patients.
Vitamin D May Bolster Immune System
Sometimes called the sunshine vitamin, vitamin D may play an important role in keeping older adults healthy, according to one new study.
RA Patients’ Long-Term Response to Rx
Rheumatoid arthritis can be treated with a variety of medications, depending on what works best for a patient. Sometimes, however, effective medications come with unwanted side effects.
Short-Course RA Therapy May Offer Long-Term Relief
The goal of treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is to dial down disease activity and provide relief from the pain, stiffness, joint damage and functional problems. A recent study highlighted one treatment that may help.
Number of Years with Arthritis Not Tied to Heart Troubles
Inflammation in arthritis clearly causes joint pain, but it has been tied to heart troubles too. A new study explored if more time with arthritis might affect the risk for heart issues.
Depression in RA Patients May Be Higher Than Previously Reported
People with severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) can be depressed about their health situation and anxious about what lies ahead. A new study looked at just how many people with RA were depressed.
Fifty Years Later, Work Remains to Curb Smoking
Fifty years ago, the US Surgeon General first warned of the dangerous effects of smoking. On the anniversary of that announcement, the current Surgeon General has released new data.