Health News

Cancer Screening: It Could Be Hard to Get the Facts
Most people would agree that cancer screening is a good thing. After all, you're either preventing cancer or catching it early. Unfortunately, the majority of cancer screening guidelines may be lacking in important patient information.
FDA Expands Indication For Breast Cancer Rx
On February 19, 2016, the U. S. Food and Drug Administration approved palbociclib (IBRANCE Capsules, Pfizer, Inc.) in combination with fulvestrant for the treatment of women with hormone receptor (HR)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative advanced or metastatic breast cancer with disease progression following endocrine therapy.
The Effect of BRCA Testing on Breast Cancer Treatment
Genetic testing in younger women with breast cancer may be getting more common. And that could have an effect on those women's future treatment decisions.
Cancer: Like Mother, Like Daughter?
Children inherit many things from their mothers. Unfortunately, cancer risk is no different.
Breast Cancer Biopsy? Meditate
Sometimes when you're facing a big, important medical procedure, all you can do is say "Om." And, as it turns out, that might help.
When Should Women with DCIS Get Radiation?
What if there was a way to predict which cancer patients would benefit from radiation therapy? New evidence suggests, for one type of breast cancer, there could be.
Nothing Compares to Mother’s Milk
What would happen if nearly every mother around the world breastfed her babies? Great things, new evidence suggests.
What Teen Girls Should Know About Fiber
High-fiber diets offer many health benefits, such as regular bowel movements and lower cholesterol levels. But they may do much more.
Cancer Screening: The Downside of Vigilance
There's no doubt about it: preventative cancer screening can save lives. But new evidence suggests that some screenings may be inappropriate and even risky.
Mammograms and Younger Women: The New Findings
False-positives are a potential downside of breast cancer screening, and one that the US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) says patients and their doctors should consider.