Health News

Happy HIV Patients Take Meds
Living with HIV means sticking to a pretty strict regimen of meds. Skipping those meds can be dangerous. Making HIV patients happier with their health care may help them stick with that regimen in the long run.
Handheld, Lab-Quality HIV Test
Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) can’t be cured, but it can be managed with treatment. The first step is an accurate diagnosis. In remote areas, diagnosis may have just improved.
HIV Positive? Check for Skin Cancer
If you have human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), you may have a higher risk of certain types of skin cancer. With any type of skin cancer, early detection and treatment is the key.
New Vaccine Recommendation for Adults
Adults with certain immune system conditions often require different recommendations for the vaccines they can and should receive. A new vaccine has been added to these recommendations.
Got HIV? Higher Pneumonia Risk With Smoking
Smoking is unhealthy for the healthiest of people. But for people with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), smoking is even worse. Want to stay healthy with HIV? Quit smoking now.
Fulyzaq Approved for HIV Patients
This week, the US Food and Drug Administration announced approval for Fulyzaq , a drug designed to treat symptoms of diarrhea in HIV/AIDS patients. It's the first drug for this purpose to win FDA approval.
FDA Approves First Anti-Diarrheal Drug for HIV/AIDS Patients
The US Food and Drug Administration today approved Fulyzaq ( crofelemer ) to relieve symptoms of diarrhea in HIV/AIDS patients taking antiretroviral therapy, a combination of medicines used to treat HIV infection. Diarrhea is experienced by many HIV/AIDS patients and is a common reason why patients discontinue or switch their antiretroviral therapies. Fulyzaq is intended to be used in HIV/AIDS patients whose diarrhea is not caused by an infection from a virus, bacteria, or parasite. Patients take Fulyzaq two times a day to manage watery diarrhea due to the secretion of electrolytes ...
HIV Positive? Quit Smoking!
Smoking is bad for everyone, but for people with compromised immune systems like HIV patients—it’s even worse. Smoking cessation can improve HIV treatment plans.
Young People Still Vulnerable to HIV
It's been 24 years since the first World AIDS Day. There have been great advancements in fighting HIV/AIDS, but new infections in young people means there's still a long way to go.
Race Plays a Role in HIV/HCV Fatalities
These days, people with HIV are most likely to die from complications of an opportunistic infection. But can race make a difference in how disease plays out?