Health News

Blistering Burns Predicted Skin Cancer
Years of research and health education have made it known that the more sun you get, the higher the odds of eventually developing skin cancer. And sunburns could boost that risk even further.
Rare Type of Skin Cancer More Likely to Recur
The skin cancer melanoma comes in a variety of forms. One rare form of this cancer, called acral melanoma, may do something that other melanomas don't do.
Indoor Tanning Devices Will Have New Warnings
Many young people strive for tan skin, but this quest could put them at a risk for cancer. Health officials announced changes to how indoor tanning devices are regulated.
FDA to Require Warnings on Sunlamp Products
Today, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration issued a final order reclassifying sunlamp products and ultraviolet (UV) lamps intended for use in sunlamp products from low-risk (class I) to moderate-risk (class II) devices.
Without Burning, Indoor Tanning Still Poses Serious Risk
Many people use tanning booths to achieve a golden tan, believing they are avoiding burns and subsequently skin cancer by doing so. But that doesn't seem to be the case.
Six Highly Treatable Cancers
The diagnosis and treatment of cancer has come a long way in the last 50 years. Today, many patients are living past their cancers.
How to Stay Safe in the Summer Sun
Skin cancer is the most common form of cancer, and also the easiest to cure if diagnosed and treated early. Left unimpeded, though, skin cancer can lead to disfigurement or even death.
Single Men Might Ignore Signs of Melanoma
Skin cancer is common and has a high survival rate if detected early. A new study suggests that one group may be more likely to find out about their cancer once it's already at an advanced stage.
Indoor Tanning Popular Among Teens
Indoor tanning, much like sunbathing on a sandy beach, is a risk factor for skin cancer. The practice is particularly dangerous for younger users.
Teens Seemed to Fear Wrinkles More Than Skin Cancer
The possibility of skin cancer would seem to be a strong motivator to use sunscreen, but maybe not for young people. One new study found that teens may be more worried about how they will look as they age, rather than the possibility of cancer.