Health News

Falling Glucose, Foggy Thinking
Balanced blood sugar keeps energy circulating through the brain. Several studies have explored the effect of blood sugar levels on that major organ, which controls every other organ and aspect of the human body.
A Healthy Heart to Keep Your Wits
Diabetes has been linked to dementia. But diabetes alone may not be the cause of this type of mental decline. Heart disease risk factors may be the real driver behind cognitive impairment.
Offbeat Heartbeat and an Aging Mind
Old age can bring with it a host of mental and physical issues, including heart conditions and cognitive problems such as dementia and memory troubles.
Killing Two Ills with One Pill
The dementia associated with Alzheimer’s disease cannot be cured, but medication is available to improve the ability to think and remember.
Another Risk Factor for Dementia?
Having difficulty remembering things or developing dementia is not always a normal part of aging. Many different factors can contribute to the risk of dementia.
Sleep Apnea a Factor in Alzheimer’s?
More than 18 million American adults have sleep apnea. The condition is more common in the elderly, especially those with Alzheimer’s disease. 
Rx That Put a Wrench in the Works
Several medications that help with common ailments could contain chemicals that get in the way of memory function. Communicating about these risks with a healthcare provider may help improve safety.
Needing a Little Help from Their Friends
Even if adults over age 65 are living on their own, they still may be experiencing memory problems or confusion. Many of these adults may also need help for daily activities.
Still Sharp After Anesthesia
Being a bit foggy in the brain during the weeks or months after major surgery is a reality for many aging adults. But it’s not a certain sign of any lasting problems with their mental health such as dementia or Alzheimer's disease.
Depression and a Declining Mind
Healthcare providers have been searching for ways to reduce the risk for developing dementia. Treating depression may, in some way, help the mind stay sharp.