Health News

Multiple Personality Disorder Unraveled
For most people, sleep problems can cause a range of health issues, but new research reveals they may contribute to a different mental health problem: dissociative identity disorder.
Sleep Soundly or Lose Your Memory
If you wake up frequently throughout the night you could be at greater risk of memory loss later on, new research suggests.
Shorter Sleep When Parents Weep
While adolescent sleep problems are common, they can lead to issues with cognitive function and emotional control, ending in behavioral disturbances. New research suggests that the mood and relationships of parents may be contributing to these sleep disturbances. 
Merck Drug for Insomnia
Merck, known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, provided an update on the development program for suvorexant , the company's investigational orexin receptor antagonist, which, if approved, will be a new mechanism for the treatment of insomnia.
Sleep Apnea's Stroke at Midnight
Untreated sleep apnea has been linked to a long list of health risks. Now silent strokes - where the person doesn't know they had a stroke - can be added to that list.
Sleep Well, Hunger Less
If you're feeling hungrier than usual, take a look at your sleeping habits - are you getting enough sleep? If not, that may be the reason for the extra appetite.
Good Sleep Helps Keep a Heart Healthy
Obstructive sleep apnea is already known to increase the risk of cardiovascular problems in men, but women appear to be at risk of heart attack if they have sleep apnea as well.
A Nap a Day Keeps Tantrums Away
Skipping a nap - even for one day - has a significant effect on toddlers' ability to express enthusiasm and deal with frustration according to a recent study.
Do Downward Dog for Better Downtime
If menopause is keeping you up at night, consider using part of your days for yoga sequences that a study has shown will help reduce that insomnia.
Finally Sleeping Soundly
The drug Ambien has established effectiveness at helping insomniacs, people who spend their nights trying to somehow charm their own body into giving up wakefulness. A new study finds that patients with primary insomnia are unlikely to escalate their dose.